Snapchat’s New Policy Changes: Don’t Worry You Still Have Your Privacy

by SAMUEL ANTEZANA

The Internet was rattled after Snapchat released their newest policy changes causing rumors to circulate that its changes now allow for the company to use people’s content as they see fit. But recently, Snapchat released a statement on their Tumblr page to clarify any confusion about the policy update.

One of the biggest concerns which resonated throughout multiple articles and comments on the Internet revolved around the issue of privacy.

Naturally, all of us want to be ensured that we have some level of privacy and control concerning the things we post on any social media accounts, but the reality of the matter is that most companies have wide access to the content you post because social media companies are simply set up that way. Nevertheless, using people’s pictures, videos, or texts in a context that falls outside of the realms of social media is where things begin to get sticky, which is one of the main things that Snapchat wanted to address.

“We never want to create any misunderstanding over our commitment to protecting your privacy,” Snapchat reaffirmed within their statement, declaring that snaps and chats are removed from their servers once they receive the information that shows if someone has viewed the snap or if it has “expired.” They also go on to say that Snapchat does not horde anyone’s content and never intends to do so.

However, they mention that Snapchat retains the right to take a person’s snaps that are submitted for Live Stories, which is an entity of snaps from people who submit them that could be showcasing different places around the world or things going on in them.

Regardless of this, Snapchat states that “the Privacy Policy and your own privacy settings within the app could restrict the scope of that license so that your personal communications continue to remain truly personal.”

The biggest changes to the actual policy were mostly on the format and readability of them, such as rewriting their terms and privacy policy so that more people could go through them and not need a lawyer to interpret the foreign language of “Gotcha!” to them (that was a joke). Two of the other changes included “language to the Terms of Service regarding in-app purchases,” and clarifying information of all users so that you can customize your name and make that visible to the people you want to.